Climate change might hit the economy harder, faster than thought

The economic effects of global warming may arrive sooner and with a bigger impact than previously thought, according to Oxford Economics in a report that compares recent scientific research with the economic literature on the costs of climate change. In the absence of efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, the earth could warm by 2 °C by 2050, cutting global gross domestic product by 2.5% to 7.5%, Oxford estimates, with the worst affected countries being in Africa and Asia. Longer term, a rise in temperatures of 4 °C by 2100 could cut output by as much as 30%.

Source: Climate change might hit the economy harder, faster than thought

Opinion: How should SA’s gas infrastructure be configured for a least-cost power system?

As outlined in the previous Transition Talk column (see Engineering News July 12–18, page 51), while gas will become more important in South Africa’s future electricity system, its role should not be overstated. Even in the absence of other flexibility options – such as batteries, pumped-hydro schemes, demand shifting, biogas, or the more flexible use of the existing coal fleet – only a relatively modest amount of gas will be needed to balance a system in which the penetration of variable …
Source: Opinion: How should SA’s gas infrastructure be configured for a least-cost power system?

Sasol’s South Africa plants threatened by emission standards

Sasol said some of its South African plants are under threat from sulfur dioxide emission standards that it will need to comply with by 2025. The company, South Africa’s biggest by revenue, operates plants that convert coal into motor fuel and chemicals in Secunda, east of Johannesburg, and Sasolburg to the south. Flue-gas desulphurisation equipment needed to cut emissions of the gas, which causes acid rain and a range of health complications, is too costly and technically difficult to install, Sasol said. Globally, as well as in South Africa, the company produces a range of chemicals.

Source: Sasol’s South Africa plants threatened by emission standards

EIA public process for proposed Richards Bay power plant open for comment

A revised environmental-impact assessment (EIA) report for the proposed development of State-owned Eskom’s Richards Bay combined cycle power plant (CCPP), and its associated infrastructure, is available for review and comment from July 24 to August 26. Subsequent to the report’s initial release in March, the report has been updated with additional information.

Source: EIA public process for proposed Richards Bay power plant open for comment